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    Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

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    Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Mon May 17, 2010 8:04 am


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    The oil slick as seen from space by NASA's Terra satellite on May 1, 2010.

    How Bad Could the BP Spill Get?
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    BP Oil Spill Could Be Up to Five Times Official Estimate
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Mon May 17, 2010 8:40 am

    It amazes me that such a tremendous disaster could be created with such unreliable safety plans along with it.

    I'm no oil extracting engineer, but I would imagine it wouldn't be impossible to create oil tubes with failsafe supply shut off valves within in the pipes.

    Its not like these gigantic oil companies don't have the funding and resources for adequate research and development in that area. Rolling Eyes


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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Extant on Tue May 18, 2010 4:10 am

    This is some pretty serious shit. The consequences of this look to be dire. Evil or Very Mad
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Thu May 20, 2010 3:46 pm

    It is pretty outrageous. It has reached the shores of some of the Gulf states now.

    NEW ORLEANS – BP conceded Thursday that more oil than it estimated is gushing into the Gulf of Mexico as heavy crude washed into Louisiana's wetlands for the first time, feeding worries and uncertainty about the massive monthlong spill.

    Mark Proegler, a spokesman for oil giant BP PLC, told The Associated Press that a mile-long tube inserted into a leaking pipe over the weekend is capturing 210,000 gallons a day — the total amount the company and the Coast Guard have estimated is gushing into the sea — but some is still escaping. He would not say how much.

    Several professors who have watched video of the leak have said they believe the amount spewing out is much higher than official estimates.

    Proegler said the 210,000 gallons — 5,000 barrels — has always been just an estimate because there is no way to measure how much is spilling from the seafloor.

    "I would encourage people to take a look at the changing amount of oil coming from the ocean floor," said Steve Rinehart, another BP spokesman. "It's pretty clear that now that we're taking 5,000 barrels of oil a day, there's a significant change in the flow reaching the sea."

    A live video feed of the leak posted online Thursday at the insistence of U.S. Rep. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., shows what appears to be a large plume of oil and gas still spewing next to the tube that's carrying some of it to the surface.

    "What you see are real-time images of a real-world disaster unfolding 5,000 feet below the surface of the Gulf," Markey said. "These videos stand as a scalding, blistering indictment of BP's inattention to the scope and size of the greatest environmental catastrophe in the history of the United States."

    The well blew out after an explosion a month ago on the offshore drilling rig Deepwater Horizon that killed 11 people. At least 6 million gallons have spilled so far, making it the worst U.S. environmental disaster in decades. The Exxon Valdez tanker spilled 11 million gallons in Alaska in 1989.

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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Fri May 21, 2010 9:34 pm

    here's another NASA picture of it

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    its pretty huge


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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Extant on Sat May 22, 2010 4:24 am

    Fucking hell. Shocked
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Sat May 22, 2010 8:20 am

    Its always particularly disappointing when you realize it still hasn't been stopped. Its just been spilling for a month now...Billions of gallons of oil, spills out and destroys part of the oceanic economy which will undoubtedly effect us in the long run, and everyone is just sitting around with their hands on their asses just talking about it.

    How many more months does this disaster need to go on? 2 more months, 6 months, a year? What would the Atlantic look like by then? Perhaps something like this? [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    The lack of response reminds me of Hurricane Katrina, but much worse IMO.


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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Agogwe on Sun May 23, 2010 11:01 pm

    Add to it the fact that BP is trying skirt as much responsibility as they can for the problem they caused, and they have politicians backing them and calling everyone who goes against the corporatocracy "Un-American". I love how calling out a corporation for creating untold amounts of damage to land and people is wrong and something U.S. citizens shouldn't do. Wow.
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Mon May 31, 2010 1:41 pm

    Yeah, that's messed up Agogwe. If there is a current event disastrous enough to put ideology aside, it would be this one.

    So far every single attempt to stop the leak has failed. I heard BP is trying a new tactic that may make the problem leak more profusely before it is fixed...and there have been estimates that they don't see it stopped until sometime around August. Shocked


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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Extant on Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:16 pm

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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:52 pm

    Thanks for the tracker Shocked

    Oh man...and my alarms were raised when I had realized it was spilling for 2 weeks...but that was a long time ago (relatively speaking)...and it's still spilling! The Gulf Region will but fucked up for the next century or so.

    If you want a real face palmer, check this out

    16 Burning Questions About The Oil Spill That We Deserve To Have Answered
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Extant on Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:11 pm

    The coverage of this oil spill has become nigh on obscene though. As serious as it is, the above tracker and, more importantly, the real time video feed of the erupting, ejaculating black gold, is merely disaster pornography. Baudrillard would have had something to say on this. He early on identified the pornographic nature of wall to wall saturised media.
    As the the following blogger, full of biting, savage rage has to say, there is far worse in terms of sociocultural and ecological destruction that has been inflicted on the Middle East by the good ol' US of A and its lapdogs:

    An Arab Woman's Blues - Back to the Recycle Garbage Bin.

    The sort of hand wringing that is taken place now (mostly justified) has enver taken place on this sort of scale for the Western world fucking up the Middle East, and a great deal of the globe.

    The following is also of interest I think:

    Philosophy of Science Portal Blogspot - "California's legendary oil spill" - The Lakeview gusher of 1910 spewed 378 million gallons of oil in Kern County scrubland, far more than the gulf spill wreaking havoc today.

    Above Top Secret Forum has created a purpose built sub-forum for the Deepwater Horizon topic as it was blitzed with the greatest number of thread creations on a topic in it's history in so short a time I believe. Thirty thousand threads thus far, or something...

    Deepwater Disaster Topics Overview
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:32 pm

    Your use of vocabulary is thoroughly entertaining Extant lol. You're right, whenever there's outrage over a tragedy, there's a great likelihood that there's an even greater tragedy elsewhere whose not getting comparable media coverage or concern.

    That's interesting about ATS. I bet the conspiracy world is going crazy with this one, ya.


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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Extant on Fri Jun 18, 2010 5:44 pm

    New York Times: Far From Gulf, a Spill Scourge 5 Decades Old

    Spoiler:
    BODO, Nigeria — Big oil spills are no longer news in this vast, tropical land. The Niger Delta, where the wealth underground is out of all proportion with the poverty on the surface, has endured the equivalent of the Exxon Valdez spill every year for 50 years by some estimates. The oil pours out nearly every week, and some swamps are long since lifeless.

    Perhaps no place on earth has been as battered by oil, experts say, leaving residents here astonished at the nonstop attention paid to the gusher half a world away in the Gulf of Mexico. It was only a few weeks ago, they say, that a burst pipe belonging to Royal Dutch Shell in the mangroves was finally shut after flowing for two months: now nothing living moves in a black-and-brown world once teeming with shrimp and crab.

    Not far away, there is still black crude on Gio Creek from an April spill, and just across the state line in Akwa Ibom the fishermen curse their oil-blackened nets, doubly useless in a barren sea buffeted by a spill from an offshore Exxon Mobil pipe in May that lasted for weeks.

    The oil spews from rusted and aging pipes, unchecked by what analysts say is ineffectual or collusive regulation, and abetted by deficient maintenance and sabotage. In the face of this black tide is an infrequent protest — soldiers guarding an Exxon Mobil site beat women who were demonstrating last month, according to witnesses — but mostly resentful resignation.

    Small children swim in the polluted estuary here, fishermen take their skiffs out ever farther — “There’s nothing we can catch here,” said Pius Doron, perched anxiously over his boat — and market women trudge through oily streams. “There is Shell oil on my body,” said Hannah Baage, emerging from Gio Creek with a machete to cut the cassava stalks balanced on her head.

    That the Gulf of Mexico disaster has transfixed a country and president they so admire is a matter of wonder for people here, living among the palm-fringed estuaries in conditions as abject as any in Nigeria, according to the United Nations. Though their region contributes nearly 80 percent of the government’s revenue, they have hardly benefited from it; life expectancy is the lowest in Nigeria.

    “President Obama is worried about that one,” Claytus Kanyie, a local official, said of the gulf spill, standing among dead mangroves in the soft oily muck outside Bodo. “Nobody is worried about this one. The aquatic life of our people is dying off. There used be shrimp. There are no longer any shrimp.”

    In the distance, smoke rose from what Mr. Kanyie and environmental activists said was an illegal refining business run by local oil thieves and protected, they said, by Nigerian security forces. The swamp was deserted and quiet, without even bird song; before the spills, Mr. Kanyie said, women from Bodo earned a living gathering mollusks and shellfish among the mangroves.

    With new estimates that as many as 2.5 million gallons of oil could be spilling into the Gulf of Mexico each day, the Niger Delta has suddenly become a cautionary tale for the United States.

    As many as 546 million gallons of oil spilled into the Niger Delta over the last five decades, or nearly 11 million gallons a year, a team of experts for the Nigerian government and international and local environmental groups concluded in a 2006 report. By comparison, the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989 dumped an estimated 10.8 million gallons of oil into the waters off Alaska.

    So the people here cast a jaundiced, if sympathetic, eye at the spill in the gulf. “We’re sorry for them, but it’s what’s been happening to us for 50 years,” said Emman Mbong, an official in Eket.

    The spills here are all the more devastating because this ecologically sensitive wetlands region, the source of 10 percent of American oil imports, has most of Africa’s mangroves and, like the Louisiana coast, has fed the interior for generations with its abundance of fish, shellfish, wildlife and crops.

    Local environmentalists have been denouncing the spoliation for years, with little effect. “It’s a dead environment,” said Patrick Naagbanton of the Center for Environment, Human Rights and Development in Port Harcourt, the leading city of the oil region.

    Though much here has been destroyed, much remains, with large expanses of vibrant green. Environmentalists say that with intensive restoration, the Niger Delta could again be what it once was.

    Nigeria produced more than two million barrels of oil a day last year, and in over 50 years thousands of miles of pipes have been laid through the swamps. Shell, the major player, has operations on thousands of square miles of territory, according to Amnesty International. Aging columns of oil-well valves, known as Christmas trees, pop up improbably in clearings among the palm trees. Oil sometimes shoots out of them, even if the wells are defunct.

    “The oil was just shooting up in the air, and it goes up in the sky,” said Amstel M. Gbarakpor, youth president in Kegbara Dere, recalling the spill in April at Gio Creek. “It took them three weeks to secure this well.”

    How much of the spillage is due to oil thieves or to sabotage linked to the militant movement active in the Niger Delta, and how much stems from poorly maintained and aging pipes, is a matter of fierce dispute among communities, environmentalists and the oil companies.

    Caroline Wittgen, a spokeswoman for Shell in Lagos, said, “We don’t discuss individual spills,” but argued that the “vast majority” were caused by sabotage or theft, with only 2 percent due to equipment failure or human error.

    “We do not believe that we behave irresponsibly, but we do operate in a unique environment where security and lawlessness are major problems,” Ms. Wittgen said.

    Oil companies also contend that they clean up much of what is lost. A spokesman for Exxon Mobil in Lagos, Nigel A. Cookey-Gam, said that the company’s recent offshore spill leaked only about 8,400 gallons and that “this was effectively cleaned up.”

    But many experts and local officials say the companies attribute too much to sabotage, to lessen their culpability. Richard Steiner, a consultant on oil spills, concluded in a 2008 report that historically “the pipeline failure rate in Nigeria is many times that found elsewhere in the world,” and he noted that even Shell acknowledged “almost every year” a spill due to a corroded pipeline.

    On the beach at Ibeno, the few fishermen were glum. Far out to sea oil had spilled for weeks from the Exxon Mobil pipe. “We can’t see where to fish; oil is in the sea,” Patrick Okoni said.

    “We don’t have an international media to cover us, so nobody cares about it,” said Mr. Mbong, in nearby Eket. “Whatever cry we cry is not heard outside of here.”
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    Re: Gauging the Magnitude of the BP Oil Spill Disaster

    Post by Lucid Memes on Tue Jun 22, 2010 4:38 pm

    That is pretty interesting about Nigeria, and it should not be neglected or overlooked (as it has been for a very long time) but the unfair reality of the situation is that Western societies, with their increased levels of technological and economic complexity, also have the largest potential for larger scale catabolic collapses. Given the series of recent events, distrust in our leaders, ongoing depletion wars, economic crisis' looming, and now large scaled ecological disasters; there's a lot of reason for paranoia (which is manifesting itself in many ways)...and of course, we're the ones with the largest megaphones. Neutral *plugs ears*

    But regardless, this spill (and others around the world) need to be stopped...at least for the sake of humanity and societal prosperity. Good ecology and healthy environments are the basis of wealth.


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