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    Geomythology

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    Lucid Memes
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    Geomythology

    Post by Lucid Memes on Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:43 pm

    A topic like this could've easily been posted in the Debunker section due to the demystifying nature of the subject's inquiries. Geomythology is basically about figuring out or uncovering the geological causes of myths. But that's only if there's convincing enough evidence to conclude the myth was based on an actual geo or astro-event. You'll find that indeed, many are. I've basically been researching geomythology for years, I just hadn't realized their was a name for it.

    Geomythology is the study of alleged references to geological events in mythology. The term was coined in 1968 by Dorothy Vitaliano, a geologist at Indiana University.

    "Geomythology indicates every case in which the origin of myths and legends can be shown to contain references to geological phenomena and aspects, in a broad sense including astronomical ones (comets, eclipses, meteor impacts, etc.). As indicated by Vitaliano (1973) 'primarily, there are two kinds of geologic folklore, that in which some geologic feature or the occurrence of some geologic phenomenon has inspired a folklore explanation, and that which is the garbled explanation of some actual geologic event, usually a natural catastrophe'."[1]

    The claim is that oral traditions about nature are often expressed in mythological language and may contain genuine and perceptive natural knowledge based on careful observation of physical evidence. Geomythology alleges to provide valuable information about past earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, impact events, fossil discoveries, and other events, which are otherwise scientifically unknown or difficult to trace.

    To be distinguished from this are plainly aitiological tales that account for geological features without any connection to their formation; an example is the Native American legend of a giant bear chasing a couple who were saved when the land rose beneath their feet; the bear's claws left gouge marks on the sides of the uplift known today as Devils Tower, Wyoming.

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    Extant
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    Re: Geomythology

    Post by Extant on Sat Apr 03, 2010 6:08 am

    Velikovsky, and subsequent researchers in that vein, have certainly pursued their own geomythological origins for folklore and legends, eh? I still haven't read any of Velikovsky's stuff, but the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (with David Talbott and co.) and people like [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] go into this sort of thing a lot, especially if you count astronomical phenemona in this area of study.

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