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    The Synarchy Discussion

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    warrenBbull
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    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by warrenBbull on Tue Jun 16, 2009 7:44 pm

    This thread has been edited to contain several threads and posts of this topic's subject matter. Spoiler tags were used for surface brevity.

    - Lucid Memes




    Synarchy, the polar opposite of anarchy:

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    Agartha Info -
    Spoiler:
    Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary city that is said to reside in the Earth's core. It is related to the belief in a Hollow Earth and is a popular subject in Esotericism.

    Agartha is one of the most common names cited for the society of underground dwellers. Shamballa (also known as Shambalah or Shangri-La) is sometimes said to be its capital city.[1] The mythical paradise of Shamballa is known under many different names: It has been called the Forbidden Land, the Land of White Waters, the Land of Radiant Spirits, the Land of Living Fire, the Land of the Living Gods and the Land of Wonders. Hindus have known it by the Sanskrit term, Aryavarsha (literally: "The Land or Realm of The Aryans; the Land of the Noble/Worthy Ones") - the land from which the Vedas come; the Chinese as Hsi Tien, the Western Paradise of Hsi Wang Mu, the Royal Mother of the West; the Russian Old Believers, a nineteenth-century Christian sect, knew it as Belovodye and the Kirghiz people as Janaidar. But throughout Asia it is best known by its Sanskrit name, Shambhala, meaning "the place of peace, of tranquility."

    While once a popular concept, in the last century little serious attention has been paid to these conjectures (with the exception of Adolf Hitler), and the theory is not supported by modern science. The idea of subterranean worlds may have been inspired by ancient religious beliefs in Hades, Sheol, etc. Ferdynand Antoni Ossendowski's 1920 book Beasts, Men, and Gods also discusses Agartha. The myth of "Agartha" is also known as "Shambhala", as it was known in India, the underworld realm peopled by initiates and led by "the Masters", Masters who are the Spiritual leaders of humanity.

    According to Alexandre Saint-Yves d'Alveydre (1842-1909) of France, the secret world of "Agartha" and all of its wisdom and wealth "will be accessible for all mankind, when Christianity lives up to the commandments which were once drafted by Moses and Jesus," meaning "When the Anarchy which exists in our world is replaced by the Synarchy." Saint-Yves gives a "lively" description of "Agartha" in this book as if it were a place which really exists, situated in the Himalayas in Tibet. Saint-Yves' version of the history of "Agartha" is based upon "revealed" information, meaning received by Saint-Yves himself through "attunement".[2]

    Shambhala concept figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Blavatsky and Theosophical Society. As with many concepts in Vajrayana Buddhism, the idea of Shambhala is said to have an "outer," "inner," and "secret" meaning. The outer meaning understands Shambhala to exist as a physical place, although only individuals with the appropriate karma can reach it and experience it as such. There are various ideas about where this society is located, but it is often placed in central Asia, north of Tibet. The inner and secret meanings refer to more subtle understandings of what Shambhala represents, and are generally passed on orally.[3] Alice Bailey transformed it into a kind of extradimensional or spiritual reality. The Roerichs see its existence as both spiritual and physical.







    Purported Entrances:

    * Cueva de los Tayos (Cave of the oil birds), Ecuador
    * Gobi Desert, Mongolia.
    * Great Pyramid of Giza
    * Iguaçu Falls, Argentina and Brazil
    * Kunlun Mountains, China.
    * Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, USA
    * Manaus, Brazil
    * Mato Grosso, Brazil
    * Mount Epomeo, Italy
    * Mount Shasta, California (the Agharthean city of Telos)
    * North Pole
    * Rama, near Jaipur, India
    * South Pole
    * The Well of Sheshna in Benares, India (the Agharthean city of Patala)
    * Mù, near Edolo, Italy
    * El Dorado, the fabled city of gold.


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    Hollow Earth, Agartha, DNA, Serpent Magnetism:

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    It's a good site for exploring hollow earth theories....


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    An old post of Warren recognizing Theosophy (Synarchy) in Kealey's work (3/4/09) -
    Spoiler:
    I know some people here may think I'm just trying to "expose Glen" but really I'm not.... I've been digging through his work and seeing what I can verify, and with my own work I can so far verify much of what he's been teaching... I can verify the soul is in our DNA (with a quote from Nieztche in "Thus Spake Zarathustra"), I can verify to myself that we were engineered by something.... And that definately lends credibility to the trog theories. The thing about the spine and the intuition has some way of resonating with me as well, though i haven't officially confirmed it yet.


    I was researching MOHO Discontinuity, and inner earth theories and I came across this web article written by a THEOSOPHY web site:

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    if you follow this link to the bottom where it has a link to their home page, you'll end up here:

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    I find this confusing..... Much of Glen's information begins to add up for me.... The fossils in evolution show me we were likely engineered away from our true form.... However, on the other hand, trog theories sound just as outlandish as alien theories at first glance... Although I guess if I had to say one was more likely (from the writings I've been studying) trogs, or better yet neanderthals, would probably be more likely..... I dunno, I find this confusing.....

    But some of it's claims appear to be definately true to me from my own experiences, if not always taken literally.... Yet I also don't wanna fall down this new age hole and I've got to guard my mind against this stuff......

    I know there's a lot of truth in what he's putting out but at the same time, it appears there might be something kinda fishy smelling too... He could be leading us into some theosophy stuff or something.... But then again, some of this stuff does appear to be ringing true.... So I dunno, I'm confused. I'm very very confused with this....

    Once again, here is the web site:

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    that page was an offshoot from it's homepage here:

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    So I am asking hypothetically, inquisitively, and humbly, if someone could please help me understand this.... Rather all this stuff I'm adding up and putting together, is legit or is it a trap? It fits, but then I hear theosophists talking about the same stuff and that tends to add some doubts as well.... So I'm confused; I feel like I'm digging up self-contradicting information....
    Synarchy and Glen -
    Spoiler:
    This is where I think GK is taking people, synarchy... It states:

    "Saint-Yves elaborated a political formula which he believed would lead to a harmonious society. He defended social differentiation and hierarchy with collaboration between social classes, transcending conflict between social and economic groups" and
    "Synarchism is a term which generally refers to a conservative political philosophy focused on solving economic, political, and social problems that are perceived to be precipitating anarchy. Viewing society as an organic unity, synarchists aim to a create a synarchy - a harmonious society where a corporatist government defends social differentiation and hierarchy by encouraging collaboration between social classes in order to transcend conflict between social and economic groups".


    Well that's technically what Glen's advocating, to collaborate with people high in the system.... Though some may deny it, Glen has on one hand went on about how money was the building blocks of this crooked system, but then went on to say "money isn't that bad" and how "trade ran into problems" (really, well what about the tribes in S. America and Africa who've prospered for thousands of yrs up till the present day on trade with no problems?)...

    And he went on to defend "democracy" saying "true democracy is for the people".... Democracy was NEVER for the people, all centralized governments were against the people.... Plato specifically goes into how democracy was made to evolve into dictatorship in Republic. Re-defining democracy doesn't work because we never created democracy. They did.

    According to Preston he's also stated that genetic engineering "has it's advantages". I find this rather interesting, seeing as his entire shpill is about how they genetically engineered a world of slaves and we all know where genetic engineering is headed...


    Now aside from pushing synarchy and the whole georgia guidestone bit I pretty much agree with most if not nearly all the information he's putting forward. The MOHO stuff I can verify, the neanderthals and the spirit in DNA and the spine, that I can verify. I'm still unsure about the code but I'm not focusing very hard on that (beyond etymology and semiology). So I'm definately not saying that I haven't gotten anything out of the guy's work, there is a lot of higher truth there that I wouldn't have figured out had I not ran into this source..... But I think there is always a turd in the punch bowl somewhere, and I think I found it.... I think he's leading into synarchy.
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    Extant
    Brown Belt
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    Number of posts : 555
    Registration date : 2009-04-04
    Location : The Forge

    Synarchy - Rise of the Rough Beast

    Post by Extant on Fri Aug 21, 2009 12:04 pm

    Atlantis as a super-advanced civilization, hollow earth and subterranean cities, ascended masters, Theosophy, and many other New Age and occult doctrines. Where did this burgeoning mushroom cloud of esoteric fascination come from? Maybe this transcribed lecture gives an indication. And more besides:

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    (Adapted from a lecture by LYNN PICKNETT and CLIVE PRINCE at the Saunière Society Symposium, Conway Hall, London on 19 September 1999)

    Introduction -
    Spoiler:
    "Of course, the idea that the world should be run by secret societies went down particularly well with...well, secret societies. Consequently, many of them adopted Synarchist principles. In fact, Saint-Yves' ideas transformed the esoteric underground of Europe, particularly France. Some of the greatest figures in subsequent occult history were devotees of Saint-Yves, which is not surprising because occultists, with their love of hierarchy, tend to be naturally totalitarian and unegalitarian."
    ____________________________________________________________

    As we approach the Millennium, there is a growing sense of expectancy that some event, or revelation, will change the world forever. For fundamentalist Christians it is the Second Coming - but you don't have to be a fundamentalist Christian to share the belief that the world is soon going to change, and change radically.

    The one thing that many of these expectations have in common is the sense that the past is catching up with us; that the transformation of our future will, in some way, be connected to the ancient past. Ancient sites around the world are the focus of 'Millennium Fever' but none more so than those of Egypt, and particularly the Giza Plateau. Many believe that some revelation connected with the Great Pyramid, or with the Sphinx, will be the trigger for a New Age.

    Such expectancy, such hope, such belief is very, very potent. It is wide open for exploitation: not just for financial gain, but for those who want to try to change the way we think. And that is what we believe is happening. Our book, The Stargate Conspiracy, describes a 50-year-long plot to create, and then exploit, expectations about ancient Egypt as part of what amounts to a programme of social engineering. It is a very high-level plot that, essentially, aims to hijack the very real mysteries of ancient Egypt in order to push other quasi-religious and even political ideas. Instrumental in this plot are the psychological warfare units of intelligence agencies.

    At the centre of the conspiracy is the manipulation of beliefs about the origins and history of human civilisation, in particular beliefs about the existence of an advanced civilisation in the ancient past and its influence on the earliest known historical civilisations, primarily that of Egypt.

    But the conspiracy uses ideas and concepts that have been around for quite a long time in the occult world. Our book explores the origins of those ideas, and shows how in recent years, they been pushed at the mainstream public. In brief, ideas about the origins and history of human civilisation that were developed in occult circles in the 19th century are now being promoted to the public as if they have been confirmed by recent research.

    The important point is that these ideas were originally developed to support specific systems of belief or doctrines - and some of those doctrines were, to say the least, highly questionable and often downright dangerous.

    In the last few years we have seen a wave of new books about ancient Egypt that have captured the imaginations of millions of readers worldwide. The best-known names in this 'Alternative Egypt' field are Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, and John Anthony West, and their works have been instrumental in arousing public interest in the very real mysteries of ancient Egypt.

    To be clear about this point, we are NOT saying that Hancock, Bauval and West are conscious participants in the conspiracy. But their IDEAS are certainly being used - and have been to an extent shaped - by the conspirators.

    This article looks at one specific example of the way that 19th-century occult ideas have influenced recent developments in the Alternative Egypt field.
    The Age of the Sphinx -
    Spoiler:
    The Age of the Sphinx

    The story begins with the Sphinx. Everybody will be familiar with the controversy surrounding claims that the Sphinx is far older than mainstream Egyptologists believe (which is about 4,500 years, ie it dates from around 2500 BC). This claim was made in 1990 as a result of a study of the erosion of the Sphinx and the walls of its enclosure.

    The instigator of this research was the maverick alternative Egyptologist John Anthony West. In the 1970s, West had become interested in the work of R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz (1887-1961), the occult philosopher who, in the 1940s and 50s, wrote several books in French about the religion of ancient Egypt. Schwaller de Lubicz's ideas have had enormous influence on alternative and New Age ideas about Egypt.

    Schwaller de Lubicz believed that the Sphinx was carved by visitors from Atlantis, and that it predated the ancient Egyptian civilisation by many thousands of years. He observed that the erosion on the Sphinx's body and the walls of the enclosure appears to be the result of exposure to water, rather than wind-blown sand, and argued that it had been caused by a great flood - the flood that destroyed Atlantis. John Anthony West agreed with this, and hoped to prove it scientifically.

    In 1990, West managed to interest an American geologist, Robert Schoch, in the problem. Schoch made a study of the Sphinx and concluded that the erosion was due to water - to centuries of exposure to rainfall. He pinpointed a period of extremely wet weather between 7000 and 5000 BC as being responsible. If he is right this would make the Sphinx at least 2,500 years older than it is supposed to be, which would mean a radical rethink about conventional ideas about the origins of the ancient Egyptian civilisation.

    Most of you will be familiar with this, and many will accept the redating. However, Schoch's work, and his conclusions, are still very controversial and the subject of debate. The recent book by Ian Lawton and Chris Ogilvie-Herald, Giza: The Truth, deals with this controversy in some detail, and presents evidence that raises serious questions about Schoch's conclusions. However, the most relevant point to us is that, even if Schoch is right, his dates - 7000-5000 BC - are the oldest allowed by his data. However, West (and following him Graham Hancock) has presented Schoch's work as if it really supports a much, much earlier date.

    Most significantly, West uses Schoch's work unashamedly as evidence that the Sphinx dates from at least 10000 BC, or perhaps even earlier. Ironically, after having brought in an expert to confirm his ideas, he then disregards Schoch's expertise when it suits him.

    West states that in his opinion there hasn't been sufficient rainfall in Egypt in the period given by Schoch to account for the erosion. He states that "you really have to go back before 10000 BC to find a wet enough climate in Egypt to account for the weathering on this type and scale". Hancock has followed him - writing that during the 11th millennium BC in Egypt "it rained and rained and rained".

    This sounds very authoritative. But when we checked these claims, we found that, according to all the available sources on the climate of ancient Egypt, there simply was no wet period in the 11th Millennium BC.

    So why are Hancock and West so keen to have us believe in that date? What does a difference of 3,500 years make, when even pushing the Sphinx back to 5000 BC would radically transform our ideas about the ancient Egyptian culture?

    Partly this is to fit the pronouncements of the American psychic Edgar Cayce (1877-1945), who said that the Sphinx and Pyramids were built by survivors from Atlantis in 10500 BC. But it also fits the view of history used to justify another, very specific - and in our view very alarming - form of occult philosophy. To understand this we have to go back to 19th century France, and a political-occult ideology called Synarchy.
    The New Order Begins -
    Spoiler:
    The New Order Begins

    In Britain, Synarchy is not widely known even among those interested in esoteric movements and secret societies. This is very surprising, as Synarchy and its founder have been extraordinarily influential[/color][/quote].

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    Joseph Alexander Saint-Yves d'Alveydre

    Synarchy was founded in the early 1870s by [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (1824-1909). This was a period in which many new political ideas were taking hold. Like many of a conservative mind, Saint-Yves was alarmed by the rise of Anarchy, and he developed Synarchy specifically in order to counter it. Whereas Anarchy believes that the state should have no authority over the life and behaviour of an individual, Synarchy took quite the opposite view. In other words, the more control the state has over the individual the better. This, as you can imagine, was an idea which held an attraction for many.

    Essentially, Synarchy advocates government by secret society - or, in its own terms, by an elite of enlightened initiates who rule from behind the scenes. It therefore doesn't matter which political party holds power in a state - or even what political system that state has. Synarchists would step in and take control of the key state institutions. St-Yyes identified three key pillars of society that, once under the control of his elite, would allow them to rule without the population even being aware of their existence. These were the political and social institutions, the economic institutions and the religious institutions.

    Although Synarchy can therefore rule in any kind of state, for obvious reasons it finds itself more at home among totalitarian regimes (power is held by less people, and the ruling regime doesn't change as often as in a democracy). It has therefore always attracted a greater following from the right. Synarchy is totally opposed to ideas of democracy and social equality, as it believes that some people - ie Synarchists - are natural leaders.

    However, Synarchy as devised by St-Yves was not a purely political movement. St-Yves was active in the esoteric world of 19th century Europe - he was, for example, a friend of key figures such as Victor Hugo and Lord Bulwer-Lytton - and so incorporated specific mystical and occult ideas into his system.

    St-Yves believed in the existence of spiritually superior beings that could be contacted telepathically. His elite would be made up of people who were in communication with them. He himself claimed that he was in touch with these beings, and that they actually gave him the principles of Synarchy.

    Saint-Yves drew upon many esoteric systems, from both East and West, in developing his ideas. For example, he regarded the medieval Knights Templar as the ultimate Synarchists of their day - after all, they exerted control over the political, financial and religious life of medieval Europe, his three pillars of society.

    Consequently, Saint-Yves incorporated ideas from the many neo-Templar societies that were flourishing in his day. In particular, he borrowed from a Templarist Masonic society, the Strict Templar Observance, the concept of Unknown Superiors - a group who directed the order but whose identity remained unknown to the members. However, he expanded this concept and made his 'unknown superiors' spiritually advanced beings that lived in a remote part of Tibet.

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    The Kingdom of Agarttha - A Journey into the Hollow Earth by Joseph Alexander Saint-Yves d'Alveydre

    Although Saint-Yves himself is hardly known in this country, he was incredibly influential in the development of 19th century occultism. For example, he was the person who introduced the concept of Agartha, the mysterious underworld realm peopled by initiates hidden somewhere in Tibet. The Masters with whom he claimed to be in contact lived there.

    Saint-Yves' doctrines included ideas about the evolution and history of the human race that were, at the time, novel, but which have since become commonplace in Esoteric and New Age circles. Central to his reconstruction of history was Atlantis as an advanced, global civilisation. He believed that the Sphinx was not built by the ancient Egyptians, but was created by the Atlanteans many thousands of years before the rise of Egypt. Saint-Yves placed the end of Atlantis at around 12000 BC.

    St Yves also promoted the idea of root races - a succession of dominant races each allocated a period of supremacy, but each destined to be supplanted by the next, superior race. It should come as no surprise to learn that the current dominant race is the white Aryans.

    It must be stressed that it is impossible to separate Saint-Yves' version of history from his political ideology. The history is used to justify the ideology and vice versa. Also, his version of history was the result of 'revealed' information - it lacked any historical or archaeological proof. For his followers, accepting these ideas was a simple act of faith.

    All these ideas have become, of course, part and parcel of subsequent occult beliefs, mainly because they were taken up, embellished and popularised by Madame Blavatsky (1831-1891), that larger-than-life Russian magus - some call her a charlatan - whose love affair with the mysteries of the East led to her founding the Theosophical movement. These concepts were, in turn, incorporated into the teachings of Alice A. Bailey (1880-1949), which have had a huge influence over the beliefs of the New Age - and on the development of the Stargate Conspiracy.

    But perhaps more significantly as far as this article is concerned is that some of Saint-Yves specific ideas appear in the psychic readings of Edgar Cayce. For example, Saint-Yves, in his reconstruction of history, describes a great Celtic warrior named Ram, who conquered the 'degenerate' black races in 7700 BC. According to Saint-Yves, it was the superhero Ram who created the first Synarchist Empire, which extended from Europe to India. This marked the beginning of the period of domination of the white races over the black. Curiously, in a discussion about far distant events, Edgar Cayce said that this was "some years before the entry of Ram into India". But Ram could only have found his way into Cayce's writings via Saint-Yves, who had, in fact, invented Ram and all his works.
    The Synarchist Agenda -
    Spoiler:
    The Synarchist Agenda

    Of course, the idea that the world should be run by secret societies went down particularly well with...well, secret societies. Consequently, many of them adopted Synarchist principles. In fact, Saint-Yves' ideas transformed the esoteric underground of Europe, particularly France. Some of the greatest figures in subsequent occult history were devotees of Saint-Yves, which is not surprising because occultists, with their love of hierarchy, tend to be naturally totalitarian and unegalitarian. For example, Papus (real name Gérard Encausse, 1865-1916) called Saint-Yves his "intellectual master", and when he died founded a society known as the Friends of Saint-Yves to promote his work. Papus, of course, had an enormous influence over the world of esoteric secret societies in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Another important movement that became closely associated with Synarchy was Martinism. Although this predated Saint-Yves by several decades, the principles of the two were very close - Saint-Yves was himself a member of the Martinist Order, so there was a lot of cross-fertilisation of ideas.

    This is interesting because in our last book, The Templar Revelation, we traced the connection between the Martinist Order and other secret societies that make up a network of groups, all ultimately descended from the Strict Templar Observance, which includes the Priory of Sion. It is now becoming clear that an understanding of Synarchy can shed light on the origins and activities of the modern Priory of Sion - but that's another story...

    By the beginnings of the 20th century, the Martinist Orders - and many others - were firmly aligned with the ideology of Synarchy. In 1921 the Martinist and Synarchist Order was founded in France. There were also explicitly Synarchist Masonic lodges formed in France.

    However, Synarchy has not only had influence over the occult world, but also over politics.

    As we have seen, Synarchy outlined a specific programme for the take-over of states. But Saint-Yves' aims went much further than that - he wanted the whole of Europe to be governed by Synarchy. Right from the start, an important part of the Synarchist agenda was the creation of a United States of Europe, advocating the removal of national boundaries, customs duties, and so on.

    This continued to be a central objective of Synarchy. In fact, a Synarchist document published in the 1930s refers to one of their key aims as being "the formation of a federal European Union". It advocated a United States of Europe - although it would be a Europe that, for economic reasons, would be dominated by France and Germany.

    As we saw earlier, Synarchy favours undemocratic and totalitarian regimes - they are, after all, easier to gain control of. And there is a definite connection between Synarchist groups and the origins of Fascism in Europe in the late 1910s and early 1920s.

    An organisation called the International Synarchist Movement was created in response to the Russian Revolution of 1919. According to French researchers, this was largely behind the rise of Fascism in Italy, and the creation of the Pan-European Movement in 1922.

    As might be expected, Synarchy also had some influence on the development of Nazi ideology, although Synarchists had reservations about the Nazi's emphasis on German nationalism and the Messianic cult of Hitler.

    Synarchy continued to thrive in Saint-Yves' native France. Synarchist groups were behind a wave of right-wing terrorist attacks in the 1920s and 30s. In the 1930s a Frenchman named Viven Postel du Mas (of whom more later) wrote a notorious document called the Synarchist Pact, which became their manifesto.

    In 1932, a society called the Synarchist Empire Movement was founded in France, which was described by one commentator as "a secret society with very specific and limited membership, following a definite politico-economic programme". This was behind right-wing terrorist groups such as the CSAR (Secret Committee for Revolutionary Action) - most of the CSAR's members were part of the Synarchist Empire Movement.

    In 1941, in Vichy France, a report by the police warned of a plot by Synarchists to take over the government, which noted the close relationship between the Synarchist movement and the Martinist Orders. In fact, during the trial of Marshall Pétain, the President of the Vichy government, in 1945, questions were asked about his connection with the Synarchist Pact.

    The point is that Synarchy was taken very seriously by French authorities in the 1930s and 40s. The term has entered the French political vocabulary (although the French press often use the term 'synarchy' to refer to any political or economic conspiracy, such as price-fixing cartels).

    After the War, Synarchy adopted a lower profile, but it is still very active. In fact, in recent years Synarchist groups have begun to act more openly both in Europe and in Britain.

    But what has all this has got to do with the Sphinx?
    Behind the Mask -
    Spoiler:
    Behind the Mask

    Of course, Saint-Yves wasn't the only influential Synarchist. Given the nature of Synarchy one would probably never know the names of even the most powerful. But we do know quite a lot about one of them: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].

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    R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz

    It is curious that Schwaller de Lubicz has become the 'godfather' of Alternative Egyptology even though few have read his works first-hand. His ideas mostly come to us through the books of Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval and, of course, John Anthony West, all of whom have expressed their admiration for this scholar. They refer to him as a philosopher, or as a mathematician. What is interesting to us, however, is that, although Schwaller de Lubicz was those things, they never call him an occultist - which he was.

    And they never call him a Synarchist - which he was.

    We personally find nothing intrinsically reprehensible about being an occultist, but it is curious that this aspect of Schwaller de Lubicz's life is seldom mentioned. But, given the facts, we don't find it surprising that these authors gloss over his political ideology.

    Born in Alsace-Lorraine in 1887, he was very active in the Parisian occult scene in the 1910s. He was an alchemist, whose particular claim to fame was that he was at one time believed to be the mysterious Fulcanelli, author of the seminal book The Mystery of the Cathedrals. In fact, Schwaller de Lubicz was not Fulcanelli, although he claimed - with some justification - that Fulcanelli's book was based on his own idea that the Gothic cathedrals encoded alchemical symbolism.

    A leading figure in the Paris Theosophical Society, he broke away to form his own occult organisation, which he called Les Veilleurs - the Watchers - specifically in order to carry his esoteric ideas into the political arena.

    Perhaps it will come as no surprise to discover that he has been described as a "proto fascist". He even claims to have designed the uniform for Hitler's SA ('Brownshirts'). Although it is not certain that his claim is true, Schwaller de Lubicz clearly had no problem with people thinking that it was.

    One of Schwaller de Lubicz's 'Watchers' was Vivien Postel du Mas, the man who wrote the Synarchist Pact of the 1930s. Through du Mas, Schwaller de Lubicz had a particular influence on Hitler's Deputy, the tormented and complex Rudolf Hess.

    Schwaller de Lubicz was anti-Semitic and racist - and, like the Nazis, thought that women were inferior to men. For example, he taught that women were intellectually incapable of understanding Hermeticism.

    All this is important, because it is impossible to separate Schwaller de Lubicz's political, Synarchist beliefs from his work as an Egyptologist, the work that certain authors so admire.

    Schwaller de Lubicz settled in Egypt in 1938 and for the next 15 years studied the symbolism of the temples, particularly Luxor, finding precisely what he was looking for, which was proof that the ancient Egyptians were the ultimate examples of Synarchy, because the were ruled by a group of initiates. This may be so, but then prejudice and fanaticism blinded Schwaller de Lubicz to certain facts about Egypt. For example, he claimed that there were no blacks in Pre- and Early Dynastic Egypt, despite abundant archaeological evidence to the contrary.

    So this is the man who is so revered by some of the most influential authors in the Alternative Egypt field. John Anthony West has a particular reverence for him, and wrote a book, Serpent in the Sky, presenting Schwaller de Lubicz's ideas to a popular audience.
    The Atlantis Connection -
    Spoiler:
    The Atlantis Connection

    Interestingly, it is mainly because of his hero's beliefs that West came to believe that the Sphinx was built by people from Atlantis and is much older than mainstream Egyptologists think. Above all, he seized on Schoch's work on the water erosion of the Sphinx as evidence of the involvement of Atlanteans.

    It is important to realise that Schwaller de Lubicz believed in the antiquity of the Sphinx because Saint-Yves did, and that West believes it because Schwaller de Lubicz did. So there is a direct line from Saint-Yves to us today.

    But there are problems with West's claims about the Sphinx. Not only does he over-ride Schoch's expertise when it comes to dating, he also does not appear to realise that Schoch has proved him just as wrong as conventional Egyptologists. Schwaller de Lubicz and West believed that the erosion was caused by a flood, or series of floods, whereas Schoch found that it was caused by centuries of exposure to rain.

    West and Hancock argue that the Sphinx was built by a lost civilisation, not by the ancient Egyptians. Where have we heard that before? Saint-Yves was the person who single-handedly introduced the idea of Atlantis as an ancient superpower - and that they had carved the Sphinx - which was enthusiastically taken by many occultists, such as Madame Blavatsky and, of course, Edgar Cayce.

    So must of us, without knowing it, have been exposed to the insidious and very scary beliefs of Saint-Yves in one form or another. We may think that we can accept his and Schwaller de Lubicz's historical ideas and reject the politics, but they simply can't be disentangled. It was never intended that they should be. If you accept one, you are tacitly swallowing the other.

    The problem with this particular brand of Alternative Egyptology is not so much its flawed nature, but what it - whether accidentally or deliberately - opens us up to. History should have told us that the most dangerous ideas are those that grab us totally, hearts, minds and imaginations.

    There are real, exciting mysteries about ancient Egypt. Mainstream Egyptology does tend to be arrogant and dismissive of new ideas and evidence. But it is precisely because the field is wide open that it can be abused. Let's not let our guard down because we crave signs and wonders. There are those who rely on us losing our critical faculties as soon as we hear the magic words 'ancient Egypt' or 'lost civilisation'. Whether it's the Vril Society or the Synarchists or the National Socialist Party - or, indeed, what we call the Stargate Conspiracy - it hides the same terrifying agenda. As Sally Bowles said in Cabaret of the rise of the Nazi Party in Berlin: "It's only politics - what's that got to do with us?".

    People are wary of politics these days - rightly so - but they are not so wary of an appeal to the romantic, spiritual and mystical. And therein lies the danger.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by splinters on Tue Aug 25, 2009 6:32 am

    wow great posts winston.

    So how old is the sphynx then?
    wouldnt carbon dating have settled this question a long time ago?

    This term "synarchy" it seems to be a word with "buzz" potential. If only I had came across the term earlier.

    A type of secret control of people who live life with a limited anarchy,
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:04 am

    I do think that Synarchy has a lot of potential to explain much of what we see going on today. Much further research is needed on the subject though. But considering the prevalence of the Atlantis mythos and hollow earth fables today, the role of Saint-Yves as a huge influence on Theosophy and Anthroposophy, and more occult schools of thought besides allied to possible high level political connections; I feel that this subject is well worth a look.

    The books of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] would be a starting point for info on the subject, their books deal with it quite a bit it seems.
    Though I'm far from convinced about their role in revealing Synarchism as they also deal with subjects of mystery and occult fascination themselves. I'll see once I read further into their works I guess, if they have a truly solid foundation to their theories.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Wed Dec 09, 2009 6:29 am

    That's for the info Warren. Extant, that article is pretty amazing, I can't believe I hadn't brought myself to read it sooner. There's are so many things related to this subject that I don't even know where to begin. So much of the new-age conspiracy lore can claim an ideological linage to this synarchy concept and people like Jay Weidner and Michael Tsarion stand out in my mind. The article mentioned how Schwaller de Lubicz claimed to be the alchemist "Fulcanelli," this stood out to me because Weidner used to talk about de Lubicz's ideas all the time, but he never mentioned that de Lubicz was a synarchist (as most people that quote him exclude that info as well). Weidner also often talked about the inner-earth masters and the whole nine-yards. Blavatsky admiring Michael Tsarion is as synarchist as can be and it's easy to see that. One of the main aspects of his work, is that Egypt (the pinnacle of synarchy according the synarchists) was the home of Irish Atlanteans who were marred by evil sun-worshipping Jews. This aspect is somewhat interesting, I remember Christopher Knowles mentioning that the original Theosophists were also Irish nationalists. I also wonder if this contributes any relevance to the Céile Dé. One thing that's new to me from all this is the Freemasonic [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] which appears to be part of the structural source of the "Ascended Masters" idea that Blavatsky conjured. I've been looking for the origins of this idea for quite some time now. This is forming to be a pretty good trail. Wink


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:22 am

    The following is the main text from James Webb's book The Occult Underground as it concerns Saint-Yves d'Alveydre, pages 270 - 275. He does feature elsewhere in the book but this is the main section on him. It seems that Webb thinks that [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] was more influential than Saint-Yves, who he perhaps regards as a plagiarist and con man. Saint-Yves does feature somewhat in Webb's other book The Occult Establishment as well though, so I may feature that at a later point. I know that Picknett and Prince do devote far more pages to Saint-Yves in their book The Sion Revelation so that it is another text I want to get onto soon.

    Spoiler:
    The father of the native French line of Traditional thought was Antoine Fabre d'Olivet (1767-1825). After an early popular success with patriotic plays during the Revolution of 1789, Fabre d'Olivet abandoned his place in the Jacobin Club and turned to a mystical philosophy. In 1800 lie narrowly escaped implication in a plot to blow up Napoleon's coach. The next year his Letters to Sophie on History appeared, containing a completely imaginary ac­count of the disappearance of Atlantis, a theme which he was later to elaborate in the Philosophical History of the Human Race (1824), upon which later occultists were to draw. This immense study of 12,000 years of human history introduced to occultism a concept which Madame Blavatsky was to develop in The Secret Doctrine: that of several successive races of men inhabiting the earth. The white race, Fabre thought, had appeared near the North Pole and displaced the ruling black race. (The red race had largely perished in Atlantis.) There arose among the whites a semi-divine Druid named Ram who attained a supreme position, chiefly because he discovered a cure for elephan­tiasis, and established a theocratic empire which lasted until 2000 B.C. For its originator, this was the ideal age; and it is Fabre d'Olivet who is responsible for grafting on to the Traditions the notion of specious pre-history."

    Of the Traditions he had himself little knowledge. He knew Hebrew but used it not to study the Cabala but to retranslate the first ten books of Genesis in order to reveal the true meaning of Moses, an initiate into the Mysteries of Memphis." His praise of Pythagoras was largely connected with his attempts to rediscover the Greek modes of music and hence to deduce those principles of cosmic harmony in which Lacuria was to find his inspiration." Fabre d'Olivet was a speculator and romancer first and foremost. One of his greatest successes was a fraudulent edition of the poems of a troubadour he had "discovered." Unashamedly Fabre admitted that he would have liked to do for the langue d'oc what Macpherson had done for Scotland with Ossian." It was the religious cast of his mind which discovered everywhere relics of ancient mystery religions, that enabled occultists to include him in their Traditions. Fabre d'Olivet reinforced this attribution by performing two spectacular cures on deaf-mutes with the aid of mesmerism." Through him a strain of what can only be called imaginative writing was adopted by the occultists of the 1890s whose uncritical spirit is but a measure of their need.
    Whereas Fabre d'Olivet might merely be considered an eccentric, his disciple and plagiarizer, Saint-Yves d'Alveydre, was a fraud of the highest degree. His influence as the third of the occult trinity who presided over the Rose-Croix cannot be doubted, but on the merits of the man and his works it is scarcely understandable. It is difficult to know which to dissect first: the Marquis who was no Mar­quis, or the Magus who was worse.

    Joseph-Alexandre Saint-Yves—of course, there was no d'Alveydre — was born in Paris in 1842 and died in Ver­sailles in 1909. He had many friends and disciples in the cir­cle surrounding de Guaita. Of these Papus — a great admirer of his verse which is, if possible, worse than the Abbe Constant's — was the most favored." The faithful repre­sented their master as a saintly and knowledgeable figure who, in the last years of his life, succeeded in performing the alchemical transmutation on himself whilst in retirement at Versailles. His philosophical works, preaching the social reforms he called "synarchy," were valued as evidence of his erudition. His invention of the Archeometer — an instrument for predicting events and coordinating all human knowledge — was regarded with awe." Saint-Yves claimed to have been initiated into the Mysteries of the Hindu faith by two of the highest officials of a "Brahminical Church." He preserved, Papus wrote, all his notebooks from the period of his instruction, signed by his Brahman on every page."
    His enemies told another story. The malicious Jules Bois describes him as the "master of French occultists," but gives a scarcely flattering description. Saint-Yves is represented as a dandy, a social climber who married into the nobility and bought his title from the Pope. He once claimed, says Bois, to have written 4,000 pages in three days, and to be in telepathic communication with the Grand Lama of Tibet. The famous Brahman in question was an Indian bird-fancier at Le Havre who had given Saint-Yves some lessons in Hebrew but had given up his disciple as a charlatan. After losing his wife's fortune in alchemical enterprises, the Magus retired to Versailles where he converted the room in which his wife died into a chapel and obtained permission to have Mass celebrated there. His wife's place was always laid at table; and Saint-Yves, who claimed to be in constant communication with her, would impose on visitors the ordeal of praying before the chapel altar whereupon he would declare that his wife, now an angel, had blessed the new arrival."

    More is to come. In 1886 there appeared a novel entitled Monsieur le Marquis, by Claire Vautier of the Opera, a former mistress of Saint-Yves, in which it is thought that her publisher, Flammarion, had a hand. Now the Marquis of the title is palpably Saint-Yves; and Mme. Vautier, to make doubly sure that none of her readers misses the point, in­cludes large slices from the works of the real "Marquis," foot-noted as such but used as dialogue in the mouth of her leading character. Charlatanism is the least crime of which she accuses Saint-Yves. His own father — whom the apologists of Saint-Yves delight in presenting as a tyrant—is made in the novel to say that of all the madmen he had known, his son is the most dangerous." From claiming at school that he has a mission greater than Christ's, the young man is shown as deserting from the army and taking refuge in Jersey. Here he obtains a local reputation as a mesmerist, uses his powers to secure the love of a girl whom he then gets with child and abandons. The girl drowns herself in despair. The future Marquis comes to Paris, gathers a small band of disciples and makes a name in the salons, where he is half-ridiculed, half-believed as a prophet. At one such gathering he meets the actress who stands for Claire Vautier. After a time he contrives to persuade her of his mission. The prophet then makes of his disciple his mis­tress; he also wishes to make use of her clairvoyant powers under his mesmeric influence. None too soon the friends of the heroine, persuaded that the mystic is a bad lot—chiefly, it appears, because of his plans to save the world by feeding, clothing, and even housing all mankind with algae — intervene in time to save the actress from suicide. A chivalrous friend marries her to give the prophet's child a name, while the cause of the scandal seduces a rich and ag­ing aristrocrat, avid to make gold. The story of Jules Bois is confirmed: the papal title, the loss of a fortune by alchemy. These are capped by the disillusionment of his new wife.

    Claire Vautier claimed one day to have discovered on Saint-Yves's work-table unpublished manuscripts of Fabre d'Olivet which the unscrupulous disciple was incorporating in his own work entirely without acknowledgement. Unacknowledged borrowing from this source was noticed soon after the publication of Saint-Yves's Mission of the Jews in 1884. The hypothetical empire of Ram, the curer of elephantiasis, appears in the work of M. le Marquis. But, whereas this plagiarism has been noted, others, no less ob­vious, have not. The influence of Wronski and perhaps other Messianists is detectible in Saint-Yves's idea of the "Missions" of the working class, the Indians, and par­ticularly the Jews. His crowning folie de grandeur was to publish in 1884 the Mission of the Sovereigns, by one of them. As for the famous Archeometer, "the key to all the religions and all the sciences of antiquity," it is a disc of colored cardboard with some very complex diagrammatic arrangements. But it is markedly inferior to the machine which probably inspired it — Hoene-Wronski's extraor­dinary calculating- machine, the Prognometer, which the Abbè Constant discovered one day in a Paris junk-shop. While the Master lived, the disciple had not been allowed to see the Prognometer. Now he bought it, recognizing Wronski's writing in the mathematical symbols which covered the contrivance. Something like a very complicated astrolabe, the movable spheres, discs and pointers were in­scribed with enigmatic mottoes:

    ALL SCIENCES ARE THE DEGREES OF A CIRCLE WHICH TURNS ON THE SAME AXIS;
    THE FUTURE IS IN THE PAST, BUT IT IS NOT WHOLLY CONTAINED IN THE PRESENT

    M. le Marquis de Saint-Yves d'Alveydre absorbed mystical theories how he could, and regurgitated them barely digested. His own multi-purpose algae were scarcely less adept at changing their forms. Saint-Yves's posthumous work, The Mission of India, is crammed full of notions derived from Theosophy, like that of the subterranean Himalayan realm of Agartha, whose government is Fabre d'Olivet's perfect theocracy. Even the belief of Saint-Yves that his wife appeared to him as an angel seems to be prefigured in the life of Fabre d' Olivet, to whom would appear the spirit of a foresaken mistress who had died of heart-break.
    It is clear that whatever power Saint-Yves possessed lay solely in the immediate impact of his personality. Outside Paris, the Traditions might be known in their resurrected form either through the writings of "Eliphas Levi" and oc­cultists who followed him; or as diluted in the works of poets and artists who found their inspiration in the occult. The romancing of Fabre d'Olivet might be known to a cosmopolitan like Madame Blavatsky; but to others the revival of interest in the occult served most often to draw attention to the material of the Traditions from which they could form their own syntheses.

    Ellie Howe has shown that there is a certain revival of astrology in France and Germany during the last two decades of the 19th century and a rather more long­standing increase of interest in Great Britain."' Of the other branches of Traditional knowledge alchemy had a certain following and a new version of ritual magic a very small but most influential vogue. In 1836 Joseph Anton Rotti was granted a pension by the Austrian government to make gold by the combination of various metals. His proceedings were entirely alchemical.)"' In France, apart from Saint-Yves d'Alveydre and Louis Lucas, alchemists included Albert Poisson, one of the circle of Peladan and de Guaita, and the irrascible Auguste Rodez who once attacked with a hammer a friend who joked at his experiments."' There also lived in Paris the orthodox chemist Theodore Tiffereau, who seems to have made a very small quantity of gold in Mexico in 1842 by supposedly duplicating the processes of nature. Unfortunately, he could not duplicate the experi­ment for the Academy;" and in any case this was not Hermetic alchemy. In England, Mrs. Mary Anne Attwood published in 1850 A Suggestive Enquiry into the Hermetic Mystery, which was withdrawn immediately on publication as revealing too much of the sacred Art. More lasting than her compendium of alchemy and Mesmerism was the in­terest she inspired in the occultist A. E. Waite and the Theosophist G. R. S. Mead; for although Mrs. Attwood gave her alchemical library to A. P. Sinnett of the Theosophical Society, only these two pseudo-scholars attempted to make anything of the material. 107 It cannot be claimed that there was any great revival of practical alchemy, although in France most people on the fringe of the occult groups would know something of the "art."
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Wed Dec 09, 2009 11:14 am

    Also, the "Synarchy: Movement of Empire" series of PDF books included below. I haven't read them yet but I'll put them here in case anyone finds them useful.

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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:27 pm

    ^^^

    Thanks for the info, Extant!

    I think Webb has somewhat fell for the mindset, that once you realize that a person a crackpot or conman, to equate their erroneous ideas with the failure to inspire other's to their cause. They could be a failure in accurately depicting reality, but a success influencing people to believe it. Saint-Yves d'Alveydre probably was "a fraud to the highest degree" but that doesn't mean that people don't follow and enact his ideology. Just like Madame Blavatsky...another highly influencing charlatan.

    Here's an excerpt from the book "Strange Creations" by Donna Kossy. Its about Blavatsky in relations to this subject.

    Spoiler:
    Disinterested biographers are skeptical of many particulars of this account. Though many of Blavasky’s travel claims are possible, fewer are plausible, and none of them are verifiable. Her claims of occult initiation are even less so. Her most significant boast was that she’d traveled alone to Tibet and had reached the highest level of initiation into the occult hierarchy there, having received instruction from the “Himalayan Masters.” Tibet was “closed” in the nineteenth century and all but the most devious and skilled were turned away by guards. Peter Washington points out that due to the eccentric lady’s notoriously wide girth, “The thought of the breathless, tactless and massively stout Blavatsky managing to climb steep mountains in brutal weather while concealing herself from trained observers is just too difficult to imagine. Nor is there any evidence of the existence of Master Morya or any of the other Masters of the Divine Hierarchy, Blavatsky’s alleged sources of esoteric knowledge.

    It is more likely that Blavatsky utilized a variety of published documents of Eastern religion and Western esotericism for source material. During the late eighteenth century, when Asian religion was first pried open by Western scholars, Hindu scriptures, for example, were being translated into French and English for the first time. Peter Washington suggests that HPB’s single most important source for Western esotericism was the work of popular novelist Edward Bulwer Lytton (1803-73), an expert in alchemy and neo-Platonism. Bulwer-Lytton, in turn was largely influenced by the writings of seminary-trained Frenchman Eliphas Levi (1810-75). Levi drew heavily on Eastern sources and Hindu scriptures; he taught the existence of a “secret doctrine” uniting all magical and religious systems, transmitted by long-lived adepts with magical powers. According to Peter Washington, there is a direct connection between Eliphas Levi’s “secret doctrine” and Madame Blavatsky’s Secret Doctrine.

    Madame Blavatsky’s claims of mediumship, as well, were challenged during her lifetime. Two of her employees at Theosophical Society headquarters in Adyar, India accused her of fraud in connection with her career as a medium by exposing two letters. In the letters, Blavatsky had instructed her servants to arrange phony mediumistic effects for an upcoming séance. Blavatsky “flatly repudiated” the letters and wrote the incident off as a case of revenge by employees she’d dismissed for incompetence. After this incident, however, she never returned to India.

    Scholars have leveled even more serious accusation: not only did Blavatsky arrange phony séances and lie about her sources, but much of her work was actually plagiarized. Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke wrote: “[Nineteenth century scholar] W.E. Coleman has shown that [Blavatsky’s] work comprises a sustained and frequent plagiarism of about 100 contemporary texts, chiefly relating to ancient and exotic religions, demonology, freemasonry and the case for spiritualism.” Moreover, her first major work, Isis Unveiled, “was less an outline of her new religion than a rambling tirade against the rationalist and materialistic culture of modern Western civilization.” Thus, Theosophy was (and continues to be) essentially a reactionary philosophy. It claims to revive traditional wisdom and ancient doctrines that are, in fact, the products of contemporary minds, bred of a nostalgia for a world which never existed.

    Believers, however, aren’t much bothered by skeptics and exposes. Their mythic world’s objective reality, or lack thereof, is simply irrelevant. For those who don’t feel quite at home in the material world, it’s an easy choice: between a purely physical Earth, guided by greed and heartless intellectualism, condemned by science to meaningless oblivion in the end –and a spirit-infused Earth, guided by wise masters who will lead humanity to a noble, cosmic destiny.

    Everything in that section was significant IMO, but one thing that's worth noting is the chain connection from Eliphas Levi, to Edward Bulwer Lytton (the synarchist "Vril" guy), to HPB.

    My recent studies has always lead me back to Eliphas Levi as being a focal point for occult ideas. There are sooo many occultists who trace back their ideology to him, so to find out that he was largely inspired by Antoine Fabre d'Olivet is another crucial piece of information in identifying the source. Thanks Wink

    wiki - Antoine Fabre d'Olivet (December 8, 1767, Ganges, Hérault – March 25, 1825) was a French author, poet and composer whose Biblical and philosophical hermeneutics influenced many occultists, such as [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] and [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].

    Quick question Extant, Webb mentioned "the occult trinity who presided over the Rose-Croix"...just to be certain, does this "trinity" consist of d'Olivet, d'Alveydre, and Papus?

    Extant wrote:It is clear that whatever power Saint-Yves possessed lay solely in the immediate impact of his personality. Outside Paris, the Traditions might be known in their resurrected form either through the writings of "Eliphas Levi" and occultists who followed him; or as diluted in the works of poets and artists who found their inspiration in the occult. The romancing of Fabre d'Olivet might be known to a cosmopolitan like Madame Blavatsky; but to others the revival of interest in the occult served most often to draw attention to the material of the Traditions from which they could form their own syntheses.

    Another thing I wanted to note was that, in your Webb excerpt, he kept using the term "Tradition" with a capital T. I'm not sure exactly what he's referring to, but it reminds me of the reactionary occult intellectual concept of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    One of the main occult Traditionalists was [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] who spent time as one of Papus' underlings.


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:14 am

    Lucid Memes wrote:I think Webb has somewhat fell for the mindset, that once you realize that a person a crackpot or conman, to equate their erroneous ideas with the failure to inspire other's to their cause. They could be a failure in accurately depicting reality, but a success influencing people to believe it. Saint-Yves d'Alveydre probably was "a fraud to the highest degree" but that doesn't mean that people don't follow and enact his ideology. Just like Madame Blavatsky...another highly influencing charlatan.

    Yes, Webb was always ultra-dismissive of the occult, and like all rational intellectual men (as he was then) investigating these areas dismissed occultists as charlatans and con men purely, and missed the influecne their ideas could have had, and did have. He may have also missed the whole point that such ideas may have had an esoteric purpose in themselves, a hidden cultural influencer.

    Lucid Memes wrote:... one thing that's worth noting is the chain connection from Eliphas Levi, to Edward Bulwer Lytton (the synarchist "Vril" guy), to HPB.

    My recent studies has always lead me back to Eliphas Levi as being a focal point for occult ideas. There are sooo many occultists who trace back their ideology to him, so to find out that he was largely inspired by Antoine Fabre d'Olivet is another crucial piece of information in identifying the source.


    Yep. All links in the chain.

    Lucid Memes wrote:Quick question Extant, Webb mentioned "the occult trinity who presided over the Rose-Croix"...just to be certain, does this "trinity" consist of d'Olivet, d'Alveydre, and Papus?

    Don't know. Have to read the book to find out. I've only read the section I've quoted in my previous post.

    Lucid Memes wrote:Another thing I wanted to note was that, in your Webb excerpt, he kept using the term "Tradition" with a capital T. I'm not sure exactly what he's referring to, but it reminds me of the reactionary occult intellectual concept of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    Don't know about that either, yet.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Thu Dec 10, 2009 7:30 pm

    More on that last point of Traditionalism. I was surprised when I found out about the subject as meaning more than just "traditional values" in the normal sense, but more as an entire doctrine of occultism. Traditionalism, like Synarchy, has so many cross overs into the New Age and conspiracy theories...yet I've never heard a NWer or a theorists ever talk about these subjects at all...at least not in an objective way, but theologians may have heard of it. So I think this research is really cracking into a vital avenue into the depths of the matter.

    I found out about Traditionalism when I stumbled upon this book [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]. Just reading the reviews was pretty interesting, revealing the nature of Traditionalism and its founder Guénon.

    One person in reference to the reviews says:
    "Skim the reviews and you can see that two kinds of people read this book: Traditionalists, and others.

    Most of the Traditionalists could not be more upset. Someone has taken a glance behind the curtain, cleared the smoke and taken down the mirrors. Traditionalism is just another religious tradition, as fascinating and diverse and imperfect as any other."


    Another reviewer remarks about the "revelation elitists":
    "Perennialism (also common outside the Traditionalist fold) is the idea that all religions and philosophies have a common, inner message. This message is primordial and secret, and often expressed in the form of symbols. Only a small elite can understand it."

    Traditionalism probably is an offshoot of Synarchy
    The origins of Traditionalism proper can be traced to various occult circles (around such figures as Papus, for example) and systems of Eastern wisdom and tradition.

    The wiki entry on Guenon mentions a familiar synarchist admiration for the Knights of Templar, as the last true vestiges of the "Traditionalist" ways
    The last book listed [Spiritual Authority and Temporal Power] offers a general explanation of what Guénon saw as the fundamental differences between "sacerdotal" (priestly or sacred) and "royal" (governmental) powers, along with the negative consequences arising from the usurpation of the prerogatives of the latter with regard to the former. From these considerations, René Guénon traces to its source the origin of the modern deviation, which, according to him, is to be found in the destruction of the Templar order in 1314. [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    Here's a comment about Traditionalism's similarity to Theosophy:
    "A question that comes to mind when reading this book, is how traditional Traditionalism really is? Guénon rejected the Theosophical Society, but his own message is a blend of Western occultism, Eastern religions, and even the legend of Atlantis and Hyperborea. In other words, something similar to...well, Theosophy."

    I think its worth noting that Rene Guénon had a belief similar to Theosophy, yet opposing Theosophism. He was also a convert to Surfism...in fact, it had been reported that his last words were, "Allah." So to me, it seems like Blavasky's Theosophy and Guenon's Traditionalism are similar in agreement, that the West is materialistic and corrupt and salvation is found in the spiritual religions of the East...but the main difference is that Theosophy derives from the Far East whilst Traditionalism from the Middle East...that's a distinction I notice, but I would not put too much emphasis on that particular aspect.

    It also reminds me of Alan Watt. I realized Watt was a type of Gnostic a while back, but Kealey had confirmed to me of his Sufi (Islamic Gnosticism) connections...which I accept as highly probably cause I also recognized his Islamic sympathies.


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:36 pm

    Interesting stuff Lucid. I'll look into this book further.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Sat Dec 12, 2009 4:02 pm

    Here's P&P's Redice interview on the Stargate Conspiracy -

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    Synarchy, Edgar Cayce, the CIA, Freemasonry, SRI International, the New Age, Andrija Puharich, Uri Geller, cult creation, The Council of the Nine


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Sat Dec 12, 2009 7:59 pm

    Yeah, I listened to this a while back. May give it a refresher now. Thanks.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Sat Dec 12, 2009 8:41 pm

    Robert Anton Wilson on the Western Hermetic Tradition (Synarchy)

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    Synarchy, Priory de Scion, Gnomes of Zürich, Nostradamus, Alien Hybridization, Hollow Earth, Rene le Chateau, Gérard Sède, Mathieu Paoli

    He doesn't directly say synarchy, but its obvious he's talking about it when he refers to the occult underground political movement that tried to create a united European monarchy, similar to what P&P say about the attempt to create a fascist united states of Europe


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Sun Dec 13, 2009 6:23 am

    Good talk from Wilson there. He certainly loved to swim in the seas of conspiracy lore and and New Age phantasy eh? And wasn't above lampooning it all.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:04 am

    This article has some pertinent information on the cultural and esoteric milieu in France that fostered Martinism, which is in itself hardly discernible from the doctrine of Synarchy:

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    Martinism is key.

    Also:

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    I came cross this stuff quite accidentally looking into something else.
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Wed Dec 16, 2009 9:22 am

    Thank you for these links. Appears to be good information there


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:15 pm

    The following is an excerpt from Umberto Eco's novel Foucault's Pendulum, pp. 315 - 319; a conversation between one of the main protagonists Casaubon and a more minor, though important, character; Police Inspector De Angelis. Over coffee De Angelis grills Casaubon on the subject of Synarchy. I love this conversation, it's one of the many narratives in the book dealing with the perennially ludicrous nature of conspiracy theory, where everything is upside down, inside out, "through the looking glass-esque," the plots cosmic, fantastical and uber-Byzantine. I will probably do a thread on this book, just posting excerpts; there is some spell-binding stuff in there. cyclops

    Spoiler:
    "You're the one who invited me for coffee."
    "True, and both of us are off duty. See here: if you look at the world in a certain way, everything is connected to everything else." A nice hermetic philosopheme, I thought. He immediately added: "I'm not saying that those people are connected with politics, but . . . There was a time when we went looking for the Red Brigades in squats and the Black Brigades in martial arts clubs; nowadays the opposite could be true. We live in a strange world. My job, I assure you, was easier ten years ago. Today, even among ideologies, there's no consistency. There are times when I think of switching to nar­cotics. There, at least you can rely on a heroin pusher to push heroin."
    There was a pause—he was hesitating, I think. Then, from his pocket, he produced a notebook the size of a missal. "Look, Casau­bon, you see some strange people as part of your job. You go to the library and look up even stranger books. Help me. What do you know about synarchy?"
    "Now you're embarrassing me. Almost nothing. I heard it men­tioned in connection with Saint-Yves; that's all."
    "What are they saying about it, around?"
    "If they're saying anything, I haven't heard. To be frank, it sounds like fascism to me."
    "Actually, many of its theses were picked up by Action Francaise. If that were the whole story, I'd be okay. I find a group that talks about synarchy and I can give it a political color. But in my reading, I've learned that in 1929 a certain Vivian Postel du Mas and Jeanne Canudo founded a group called Polaris, which was inspired by the myth of the King of the World. They proposed a synarchic project: social service opposed to capitalist profit, the elimination of the class struggle through cooperatives. . . . It sounds like a kind of Fabian socialism, a libertarian and communitarian movement. Note that both Polaris and the Irish Fabians were accused of being in­volved in a synarchic plot led by the Jews. And who accused them? The Revue internationals des societes secretes, which talks about a Jewish-Masonic-Bolshevik plot. Many of its contributors belonged to a secret right-wing organization called La Sapiniere. And they say that all these revolutionary groups are only the front for a diabolical plot hatched by an occultist cenacle. Now you'll say: All right, Saint­-Yves ended up inspiring reformist groups, but these days the right lumps everything together and sees it all as a demo-pluto-social-Judaic conspiracy. Mussolini did the same thing. But why accuse them of being controlled by an occultist cenacle? According to the little I know — take Picatrix, for example — those occultism people couldn't care less about the workers' movement."
    "So it seems also to me, O Socrates. So?"
    "Thanks for the Socrates. But now we're coming to the good part. The more I read on the subject, the more I get confused. In the forties various self-styled synarchic groups sprang up; they talked about a new European order led by a government of wise men, above party lines. And where did these groups meet? In Vichy col­laborationist circles. Then, you say, we got it wrong; synarchy is right-wing. But hold on! Having read this far, I begin to see that there is one theme that finds them all in agreement: Synarchy exists and secretly rules the world. But here comes the 'but'.
    "But?"
    "But on January 24, 1937, Dmitri Navachine, Mason and Martin­ist (I don't know what Martinist means, but I think it's one of those sects), economic adviser of the Front Populaire, after having been director of a Moscow bank, was assassinated by the Organisation secrete d'action revolutionnaire et nationals, better known as La Ca­goule, financed by Mussolini. It was said then that La Cagoule was guided by a secret synarchy and that Navachine was killed because he had discovered its mysteries. A document originating from left-wing circles during the Occupation denounced a synarchic Pact of the Empire, which was responsible for the French defeat, a pact that was a manifestation of Portuguese -style fascism. But then it turned out that the pact was drawn up by Du Mas and Canudo and con­tained ideas they had published and publicized everywhere. Noth­ing secret about it. But these ideas were revealed as secret, extremely secret, in 1946 by one Husson, who denounced a revolutionary syn­archic pact of the left, as he wrote in his Synarchy, panorama de 25 annees d'activite occults, which he signed . . . wait, let me find it . . . Geoffroy de Charnay."
    "Fine!" I said. "Charnay was a companion of Molay, the grand master of the Templars. They died together at the stake. Here we have a neo-Templar attacking synarchy from the right. But synar­chy is born at Agarttha, which is the refuge of the Templars!"
    "What did I tell you? You see, you've given me an additional clue. Unfortunately, it only increases the confusion. So, on the right, a synarchic pact of the left is denounced as socialist and secret, though it's not really secret; it's the same synarchic pact, as you saw, that was denounced by the left. And now we come to new revelations: synarchy is a Jesuit plot to undermine the Third Republic. A thesis expounded by Roger Mennevee, leftist. To allow me to sleep nights, my reading then tells me that in 1943 in certain Vichy military circles—Petainist, yes, but anti-German—documents circulated that prove synarchy was a Nazi plot: Hitler was a Rosicrucian influ­enced by the Masons, who now have moved from hatching a Judeo-Bolshevik plot to making an imperial German one."
    "So everything is settled."
    "If only that were all. Yet another revelation: Synarchy is a plot of the international technocrats. This was asserted in 1960 by one Villemarest, Le 14e complot du 13 mai. The techno-synarchic plot wants to destabilize governments and, to do it, provokes wars, backs coups d'etat, foments schisms in political parties, promotes inter­necine hatreds. . . . Do you recognize these synarchists?"
    "My God, it's the IMS, the Imperalist Multinational State — what the Red Brigades were talking about a few years ago!"
    "The answer is correct. And now what does Inspector De Angelis do if he finds a reference to synarchy somewhere? He asks the ad­vice of Dr. Casaubon, the Templar expert."
    "My answer: There exists a secret society with branches through­out the world, and its plot is to spread the rumor that a universal plot exists."
    "You're joking, but I—"
    "I'm not joking. Come and read the manuscripts that turn up at Manutius. But if you want a more down-to-earth explanation, it's like the story of the man with a bad stammer who complains that the radio station wouldn't hire him as an announcer because he didn't carry a party card. We always have to blame our failures on some­body else, and dictatorships always need an external enemy to bind their followers together. As the man said, for every complex prob­lem there's a simple solution, and it's wrong."
    "And if, on a train, I find a bomb wrapped in a flier that talks about synarchy, is it enough for me to say that this is a simple solution to a complex problem?"
    "Why? Have you found bombs on trains that . . . No, excuse me. That's really not my business. But why did you say that to me, then?"
    "Because I was hoping you'd know more than I do. Because per­haps I'm relieved to see you can't make head or tail of it either. You say you have to read lunatics by the carload and you consider it a waste of time. I don't. For me, the works of your lunatics—by `your' I'm referring to you normal people — are important texts. What a lunatic writes may explain the thinking of the man who puts the bomb on the train. Or are you afraid of becoming a police in­former?"
    "No, not at all. Besides, looking for things in card catalogs is my business. If the right piece of information turns up, I'll keep you in mind."
    As he rose from his chair, De Angelis dropped the last question: "Among your manuscripts . . . have you ever found any reference to the Tres*?"
    "What's that?"
    "I don't know. An organization, maybe. I don't even know if it exists. I've heard it mentioned, and it occurred to me in connection with your lunatics. Say hello to your friend Belbo for me. Tell him I'm not keeping tabs on any of you. The fact is, I have a dirty job, and my misfortune is that I enjoy it."

    As I went home, I asked myself who had come out ahead. He had told me a number of things; I'd told him nothing. If I wanted to be suspicious, I could think perhaps that he had got something out of me without my being aware or it. But if you're too suspi­cious, you fall into the psychosis of synarchic plots.
    When I told Lia about this episode, she said: "If you ask me, he was sincere. He really did want to get it all off his chest. You think he can find anyone at police headquarters who will listen to him wonder whether Jeanne Canudo was right-wing or left? He only wanted to find out if it's his fault he can't understand it or if the whole thing is too difficult. And you weren't able to give him the one true answer."
    "The one true answer?"
    "Of course. That there's nothing to understand. Synarchy is God."
    "God?"
    "Yes. Mankind can't endure the thought that the world was born by chance, by mistake, just because four brainless atoms bumped into one another on a slippery highway. So a cosmic plot has to be found—God, angels, devils. Synarchy performs the same function on a lesser scale."
    "Then I should have told him that people put bombs on trains because they're looking for God?"
    "Why not?"



    *Templi Resurgentes Equites Synarchici
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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Lucid Memes on Wed Mar 31, 2010 6:06 pm

    There are so many truths in that piece right there. I've explored so many conspiracy theories over the years, that by the time I stumbled upon "synarchy," I too were also proposing many of the same points in that passage, its hilarious lol.

    "My answer: There exists a secret society with branches through­out the world, and its plot is to spread the rumor that a universal plot exists."

    You'll start to think that after a certain point lmao


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    Re: The Synarchy Discussion

    Post by Extant on Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:05 pm

    Yeah, Foucault's Pendulum is a must read. I'm positive the narrative will resonate in a big way for you at this time. The material is fully relevant to the similar perspective we seem to have on the subject of conspiracy theory.
    There is so much in that book that will just make you think: "I have fully been there."

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