“Chapel Perilous, that vortex where cosmological speculations, coincidences, and paranoia seem to multiply and then collapse, compelling belief or lunacy, wisdom or agnosticism.” ~Robert Anton Wilson


    can anyone analyze this?

    Share

    warrenBbull
    Orange Belt
    Orange Belt

    Number of posts : 80
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    can anyone analyze this?

    Post by warrenBbull on Sat Mar 14, 2009 2:09 am

    Fredrick Niezchte: "Thus Spake Zarathustra", ch. 28- "The Rabble"


    "Life is a well of delight; but where the rabble also drink, there all fountains are poisoned.
    To everything cleanly am i well disposed; but I hate to see the grinning mouths and the thirst of the unclean.
    They cast their eye down into the fountain, and now glanceth up to me their odious smile out of the fountain.
    The holy water have I poisoned with their lustfulness; and when they called their filthy dreams delight, then poisned they also the words.
    Indignant becometh their flame when they put their damp hearts to the fire; the spirit itself bubbleth and smoketh when the rabble approach the fire.
    Mawkish and over-mellow becometh the fruit of their hands; unsteady, and withered at the top, doth their look make the fruit tree.
    And many a one who hath turned away from life, hath only turned away from the rabble: he hated to share with them fountain, flame, and fruit.
    And many a one hath gone into the wilderness and suffered thirst with beasts of prey, disliked only to sit at their cistern with filthy camel-drivers.
    And many a one who hath come along as a destroyer, and as a hailstorm to all cornfields, wanted merely to put his foot into the jaws of the rabble, and thus stop their throat.
    And it is not the mouthful which hath most choked me, to know that life itself requireth enmity and death and torture-crosses:--
    But I asked once, and suffocated almost with my question: What? Is the rabble also necessary for life?
    Are poisoned fountains necessary, and stinking fires, and filthy dreams, and maggots in the bread of life?
    Not my hatred, but my loathing, gnawed hungrily at my life! Ah, often times I became weary of spirit, when I found even the rabble spiritual!
    And on the rulers turned I my back, when I saw what they now call ruling: to traffic and bargain for power-- with the rabble!
    Amongst people of a strange language did I dwell, with stopped ears: so that the language of their trafficking might remain strange unto me, and their bargaining for power.
    And holding my nose, I went morosely through all yesterdays and todays: verily, badly smelt all yesterdays and todays of the scribbling rabble!
    Like a cripple become deaf, and blind, and dumb-- thus have I lived long; that I might not live with the power-rabble, the scribe-rabble, and the pleasure-rabble.
    Toilsomely did my spirit mount stairs, and cautiously; alms of delight were it's refreshment; on the staff did life creep along with the blind one.
    What hath happened unto me? How have I freed myself from loathing? Who hath rejuvenated mine eye? How have I flown to the height where no rabble any longer sit at the wells?
    Did my loathing itself create for me wings and fountain-divining powers? Verily, to the loftiest height had I to fly, to find again the well of delight!
    Oh, I have found it, my brethren! Here on the loftiest height bubbleth up for me the well of delight! And there is a life at whose waters none of the rabble drink with me!
    Almost too violently dost thou flow to me, thou fountain of delight! And often empties thou the goblet again, in wanting to fill it!
    And yet must I learn to approach thee more modestly: far too violently doth my heart still flow towards thee:--
    My heart on which my summer burneth, my short, hot, melancholy, over-happy summer: How my summer heart longeth for thy coolness!
    Past, the lingering distress of the spring! Past the wickedness of my snowflakes in June! Summer have I become entirely, and summer-noontide!
    A summer on the loftiest height, with cold fountains and blissful stillness: oh, come, my friends, that the stillness may become more blissful!
    For this is our height and our home: too high and steep do we here dwell for all uncleanly ones and their thirsts.
    Cast but your pure eyes into the well of my delight, my friends! How could it become turbid thereby! It shall laugh back at you with it's purity.
    On the tree of the future build we our nest; eagles shall bring us lone ones food in their beaks!
    Verily, no food of which the impure could be fellow-partakers! Fire, would they think they devoured, and burn their mouths!
    Verily, no abodes do we here keep ready for the impure! An ice-cave to their bodies would our happiness be, and to their spirits!
    And as strong winds will we live above them, neighbors to the eagles, neighbors to the snow, neighbors to the sun: thus live the strong winds.
    And like a wind will I one day blow amongst them, and with my spirit, take the breath from their spirit: thus willeth my future.
    Verily, a strong wind is Zarathustra to all low places; and this counsel counselleth he to his enemies, and to whatever spitteth and speweth: "Take care not to spit against the wind!"--

    Thus Spake Zarathustra."



    Ok, does anyone know how to break this down and overstand or interstand what he is saying here?
    avatar
    Phoenix778m
    Yellow Belt
    Yellow Belt

    Number of posts : 67
    Registration date : 2009-02-23
    Location : Seattle

    Re: can anyone analyze this?

    Post by Phoenix778m on Sat Mar 14, 2009 2:49 pm

    "Life is a well of delight; but where the rabble also drink, there all fountains are poisoned."
    It sounds like the Nietzsche is creating a logic in the beginning that life is like a water well but it is poisoned by the men who seek only pleasure in what Zarathustra see's as lustful dreams of "The Rabble". He reiterated this later in the text with "And many a one hath gone into the wilderness and suffered thirst with beasts of prey(returning to nature), disliked only to sit at their cistern with filthy camel-drivers(Can't Escape)." Nietzsche say's that many people turn away from life in reality they are only turning away from the rabble. The fruit that these lustful men create is over-ripe and to soft, it is mawkish or overrun with maggots. Mawkish also contains the idea of being sickly sentimental. Like an old person is an over ripe piece of fruit that sits and dwells on his or her lustful past and is consumed by their thoughts or maggots.

    Indignant becometh their flame when they put their damp hearts to the fire; the spirit itself bubbleth and smoketh when the rabble approach the fire." He is comparing their soul to a flame, and they are "all wet" their spirit bubbles and smokes when it come near a strong spirit/flame.

    Many of men become destroyers against the rabble to "put his foot into the jaws of the rabble, and thus stop their throat." I think Nietzsche is also vaguely saying that perhaps the men who do this become rabble themselves without understanding why they act. I think this is reinforced by the next few lines. "What? Is the rabble also necessary for life?
    Are poisoned fountains necessary, and stinking fires, and filthy dreams, and maggots in the bread of life?
    Not my hatred, but my loathing, gnawed hungrily at my life! Ah, often times I became weary of spirit, when I found even the rabble spiritual!"
    So now he has a difficult problem a "conundrum" because although he despises the rabble he knows they have the ability to be spiritual also. Zarathustra didn't want these thoughts to overtake him because he knew that he would become mawkish. So he shut himself off of these rulers who only seek power and lie about their good intentions. "And on the rulers turned I my back, when I saw what they now call ruling: to traffic and bargain for power-- with the rabble!""Like a cripple become deaf, and blind, and dumb-- thus have I lived long; that I might not live with the power-rabble, the scribe-rabble, and the pleasure-rabble." Zarathustrua then started to climb the stairs out of the rabble. When he looked back after many years he wonders if his loathing did send him up the staircase. "What hath happened unto me? How have I freed myself from loathing? Who hath rejuvenated mine eye? How have I flown to the height where no rabble any longer sit at the wells?
    Did my loathing itself create for me wings and fountain-divining powers? Verily, to the loftiest height had I to fly, to find again the well of delight!" He finds a new well filled with delight where the rabble do not drink. "Oh, I have found it, my brethren! Here on the loftiest height bubbleth up for me the well of delight! And there is a life at whose waters none of the rabble drink with me!" He has now left the world of the dead/rabble an ascended up the mountain with new wings(Red{sun}Bull gives you wings!). He compares this new spirit/fire to the summer sun at noon. He now lives with eagles and the mighty winds. He will eventually become the wind/force/spirit that steals other peoples breath/spirit and if you try to move against him it will come back in your face "Take care not to spit against the wind!"

    Nietzsche ideas of a Ubermench(Superman) was used by the Nazi's to further their idea of a superior race. This is found in the Luciferian doctrine as "There shall be no pitiful love" That you can make man strong through tough love. This chapter is just a small logical deviation to support this idea.

    warrenBbull
    Orange Belt
    Orange Belt

    Number of posts : 80
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: can anyone analyze this?

    Post by warrenBbull on Sat Mar 14, 2009 4:18 pm

    Ah, thanx Phoenix, this was very helpful.
    avatar
    intrepidpixie
    Orange Belt
    Orange Belt

    Number of posts : 107
    Registration date : 2009-02-14
    Location : Los Angeles

    Re: can anyone analyze this?

    Post by intrepidpixie on Sun Mar 15, 2009 2:47 am

    Rabble = common Pleib

    Wind= deities. The American Indians and Tibetans used to symbol of the swasticka to represent the wind. Kealey also says that the swastika represents a fan with 4 blades, able to blow and suck ( from the other side)
    Many people say that the inspiration for TSZ is the Swiss Alps, but I don`t think that "filthy camel-drivers" are found anywhere near the base of these majestic mountains...lol

    "And on the rulers turned I my back, when I saw what they now call ruling: to traffic and bargain for power-- with the rabble!"

    Sounds like he is elevating himself above both rulers and rabble for they have a symbiotic relationship. In order to be a leader, you must rely on a band of followers.

    Sponsored content

    Re: can anyone analyze this?

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:45 pm